Is agile Alive? Dead? Misunderstood?

Lats Sunday, after reading multiple “Agile is Dead” articles, I posted this short update on linkedIn

screen-shot-2017-03-05-at-11-03-37

As you can see from the stats, in less than 7 days it has received a lot of attention (I am not an influencer and my updates generally do not receive such large feedback)

My contacts in linkedIn include a lot of Agile or Lean Coaches and as expected, initially the message got some positive comments. Soon after some agile detractors joined the conversation and made it much more interesting as generally feedback that comes from different perspectives enriches the conversation adding dimensions that sometimes cannot be expressed by a biased mind.

I noticed 3 interesting trends in the messages.

  1. When agile is not driven by technology, agile fails
  2. When agile is driven by technology and not the business stakeholders, agile fails
  3. Agile is only useful to deliver something nobody wants quickly

The first 2 are extremely interesting, in fact they say exactly the opposite thing but they both come to the same conclusion “agile is dead”. I read and reread those messages and then I saw it

If agile is driven by one part of the organisation, whichever it is, and trust is not built within the whole organisation, it will fail. Do it like this and agile is dead before you even start.

If you try to own something that will change your organisation and run with it, you better make sure you share your vision, your responsibilities and your success with the rest of the organisation. How do you expect people outside your little world to want to follow you in this difficult change if they don’t know, understand, own and help you change. Agile/lean transformations are not driven by a department, they are driven by the whole.

And the result might be that you even stop talking about departments and only talk about the whole.

Now on objection #3.

Agile is only useful to deliver something nobody wants quickly

I have seen this very often and honestly makes me sad. A lot of scrum implementations have a Product Owner that is seen as the heart of the product, the person that understands the vision of the product and that takes the responsibility to take the important decisions for the future of the product in regards to strategy, prioritization and so on.

If you look at it this way, you might think that the PO is a single point of failure, in fact what if he is not able to make good decisions, how about his bias, is he a dictator?

As an agile coach I make sure that any product owner that works with me will have the tools for making good decisions. He in fact will know how to manage flow using WIP limits, he will be aware and become proficient in UX techniques, he will learn how to monitor, gather and use feedback from his customers, he will understand the importance of small experiments, he will be aware of cost of delay and when prioritising his features and user stories will have access to many advanced prioritization techniques.

Being agile does not mean automatically ignoring lean startup, lean UX, research. No that is not being agile, that is being a scrum master after 2 days training.

 

Advertisements

Constructive conversations

A constructive conversation is a conversation between 2 or more individuals on a specific subject, where any of the individuals is free to express his opinion and uses other participant’s feedback and knowledge to discover the subject to new heights.

It is a process of discovery, in which each individual participates with the goal of of higher understanding.

A constructive conversation is successful if at the end, one or more participant learned something.

A constructive conversation is even more successful if at the end of it, the higher understanding achieved also produced an agreement for action.

Constructive conversations have no scope boundaries and could be as simple as discussing what tool to use to complete a simple task, up to discussing how our own company can improve to change the world.

Constructive conversations don’t have roles, there is no master and slave, no matter what the level of seniority, each participant receives the same respect and has the same ability to pose questions and contribute their thoughts.

Constructive conversations require engaged participants with equal desire to learn and enrich knowledge for all participants.

People with shallow knowledge on a subject will mainly use the constructive conversation to learn, but will also offer perspectives and questions that might not be immediate to the people that already possess high knowledge. They have the outsider view.

People with high knowledge will help other people by sharing it and request feedback because they know that no matter how high their knowledge, they don’t own the truth.

Constructive conversations require empathy. Constructive conversations require humbleness. Constructive conversations require courage. Constructive conversations require respect. Constructive conversations require empowering leaders and empowered people.

Constructive conversations are the backbone of successful agile organisations.