One very simple tip to help teammates connect

A couple of years ago, I started working with a new development team. As a coach, I spend the first few days observing behaviours and saying very little beyond a joke here and there.

Well, this team didn’t seem to have a process or technical problem, but I noticed a strange trend at their morning standups. People were being a bit “bitchy” to each other and focusing on people rather than on the work to be done.

You could hear things like

“well, my card is still there because I have been spending all day reviewing Frank’s pull request, not great…”

or

“I was writing the new stories but then Jack changed his mind… again…”

et cetera, I’m pretty sure you know the drill.

So on day 3 I went to the standup and I said, folks, let’s do an experiment. Before you say anything, you have got to say something nice about one of your teammates, shall we try?”

People looked at me like if I had seven heads, so I went “I’ll go first. Frank, you’re looking good today, I like your shirt, very smart”

People laughed. Then they tried.

I could see they were spending some time trying to find something nice to say, they were looking at something they liked about their teammates.

As humans, we are very good at finding flaws in people, on the other hand, we need to make an effort to find something we like about them, but if we try, we can discover something that we like, helping us connect.

Another consequence of this approach was that people realised their behaviour was not acceptable without being told and felt that they came up with the idea of reducing the bitching remarks.

All in all an easy win with very little effort.

WARNING: This approach won’t produce any positive effect if the hostility between team members derives from long-standing hatred, but it works very well with newly formed teams where people are trying to make themselves noticed sometimes using means that might be confrontational to their teammates.

 

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What team do you play for?

One team One goal
One team One goal

“If you had one wish for software testing this year what would it be? I found this interesting question in a forum on Linkedin a few days back and it made me think.

Many ideas came to mind, around better automation strategies, better understanding of one’s context, better collaboration and knowledge sharing, et cetera and then it hit me.

For 2015 I wish that testers would understand what team they play for. I wish it was the year when testers realise there is no us and them with developers and business analysts. I wish testers focused on delivering value over acting like the quality police. I wish that testers stopped cracking developer’s jokes. I wish that testers started looking at the whole and stop (sub) optimizing their process. I wish that testers stopped trying to resolve problems that don’t exists and embraced collaboration with developers and BA’s to prevent defects and save their companies a lot of money in the process.

You might say “hey! that’s a lot of wishes, not one!”. No it’s only one.

It’s I wish testers chose to play for the right team.

 

Cross-dysfunctional teams

Every agile enthusiast will tell you how powerful an empowered, self-managing, cross-functional team can be. Once you have one, it brings complete team accountability from product idea to customer support, it naturally grows with continuous improvement, and finds self motivation in innovation and delivery of customer value.

It’s a beautiful and powerful concept; the practical implementation sometimes is not so beautiful and more often than not what you get, is a cross-dysfunctional team.

Let’s have a look at the cross-dysfunctional examples I have experienced.

Pseudo specialist cross-dysfunctional teamfarm-silo

Developer: “I am a developer I am not meant to test, the testers test!”

Tester: “I don’t need to know anything about how the product is designed, I only care about how the customers use it!”

Business Analyst: “I am not technical, I can’t help you guys!”


devops“As Long As It Works for us” cross-dysfunctional team

Developer: “It works in our environments, it’s operations responsibility to make it work in production”

Tester: ”Listen, it worked in UAT, it must be a configuration issue, or a missing firewall hole and nothing I could have spotted during testing…”

Customer: “Hello! Nothing works here…”

Abdicating cross-dysfunctional teamheadinsand

Developer: “The architect told me to do it like this”

Tester: “Feck it, let the Test manager deal with it”

Business Analyst: “I don’t think there is any value in this story, but the Product Owner wants it, so get on with it and develop it!”


no-thanks-were-too-busyContinuous Decline cross-dysfunctional team

Developer: “No point in doing retrospectives, things are always the same”

Tester: “We DON’T HAVE TIME to try new things!”

Business Analyst: “We do it like this, because that’s how we do things here, and that’s it!”

Disintegrated cross-dysfunctional teamWorked-Fine-In-Dev-Ops-Problem-Now

Developer: “My code works perfectly, it’s their system that doesn’t work, who cares”

Tester: “We have 100% coverage, all our tests pass and we have no bugs, if the developers of system X are idiots, there is nothing we can do about it”

Customer: “And still, nothing works here…”


ihazsuperiorityNazi cross dysfunctional team

Developer: “Testers are failed programmers, they shouldn’t be called engineers”

Tester: “Developers are only able to produce bugs, the world would be better with more testers and less developers”

Business Analysts: “I don‘t know why I bother talking to testers and developers, they are total idiots”

Do you recognise your team in one of the categories above? What have you done until now to help your team change? Little? Nothing? But you are still bitching about it, aren’t you?

Remember, you are very powerful and can become the change that you want to see.