Sometimes there is a woman

Our world disappoints me in many aspects. I fail to deal in an orderly manner with law and regulation when it impacts my ability to be free and let my mind fly.

I can’t deal with capitalism, i am poor at dealing with low empathy people, I am only starting to learn how to forgive the people that hurt me.

But then sometimes there is a woman, that makes the learning and pain worth it.

A woman that, on her own, decided to leave it all behind to go up in the Alps to run a 18th century built hotel, restaurant, pub in a 17th century sanctuary. She got beaten up by COVID-19 that forced her to close off her business, she raised up and called for help, she called me and she helped me deal with my demons of the past.

Sometimes there is a woman that is worth worshipping for the rest of my life.

Dear leader: can trust be earned? Should trust be given?

Over the years I have spoken to hundreds if not thousands of leaders and there is a fundamental aspect that differentiates them and their effectiveness: how they handle trust

Category 1 – The Micro Manager: “Trust must be earned, I am not giving trust to people that i just hired, they need to earn it”

Category 2 – The Servant Leader “I trust my employees, until i don’t trust them anymore”

It goes without saying that leaders in Category 1 suffer because they are always checking on their employees due to lack of trust. They become swamped and slow down their people and organisation with their obsession for checking work done by others.

Category 2 leaders get the full strength of their teams by allowing them to make mistakes. This can only happen when people are trusted.

I have met some inspirational category 2 leaders, if you are reading this one you know who you are.

I have also met many Category 1 leaders and if you are reading this I am really sorry you tied yourself into a knot because you can’t trust your people, maybe a non leading role is better suited for you.

But i love you both regardless and i will help both regardless if you hire me

Collaboration and roles, learning from Rugby union

rugby

I keep on hearing team mates say things like

“it’s not my job to test, I am a <insert_role>” or “It’s not my job to design the product, I am a <insert_role>”

and I am quite tired of the behaviours caused by the message when left unchecked.

A team is more than the sum of its parts, a team has the power of collaboration.

When I was young I used to play Rugby (union).

Rugby union is a highly specialised sport, in fact the 15 players on the pitch are divided in 2 main silos, “forwards” and “backs” and within the silos there are these following roles:

Forwards: 1. Loose-head prop, 2. Hooker, 3. Tight-head prop, 4 and 5. Lock, 6. Flanker, 7. Wing Forward, 8. Number eight, 9. Scrum half

Backs: 10. Fly half, 11 and 14. Wing, 12. First centre, 13. Second centre, 15. Fullback

WOW 13 different roles for 15 people in the same team, more than the usual PO/BA/DEV/TEST/UX etc. we find in modern agile teams. How come they are able to collaborate so effectively?

The difference is that nobody in a rugby team will ever use a sentence of this type:

“I am not doing X because my role is Y”

In fact the very best rugby players are not the super specialists but the ones that are good at every different skill and activity required to play rugby. (Research the case of Brian O’Driscoll to me the synthesis of excellence in collaboration skills)

When there is a ruck 2 meters from a goal line you will see the ten stone (63Kg) Scrum Half stick his head in and push the 15+ stone (95Kg+) players away from his goal line.

He won’t say, I’m a scrum half I don’t do rucks, I guarantee 100% he won’t, because if he does he will lose the respect of his teammates, his coach and his fans and never play the game again.

Why do rugby players collaborate so well even though they are such a specialistic group? Because they have one clear goal, the clear goal is to score more points than the opponents. They all get that and do their utmost to help their teammates achieve it.

Why are agile teams not collaborating like rugby players?

One of the reasons is that they don’t see a common goal in the customer value to be delivered but see the beauty of the “elegant code”, “smart test strategy”, “beautiful solution”, outstanding “user experience” and so on.

So if you want to get your team to collaborate better together you got to give them a common cause to fight for. And just to save you time, it is not lines of code, story points, tests passed, number of bugs or lack there of, it is something bigger and more important.

Discover what it is together with your team.