On empowerment and the 2 types of downtime


Downtime
Downtime

In a recent LinkedIn discussion, the topics of testing downtime and what should testers do during it was examined. I read and reread the answers a few times and I became convinced that I have a completely different view of what downtime is and how it should be utilised.

The first thing that I noticed was that test managers and leads had a substantial list of items to ask testers to do during their downtime but none of them seemed interested in asking the testers themselves what they thought they should do when in such situation.

This made me reflect on different levels of testers empowerment and respective managers levels of trust. Asking a tester to do something during downtime is not a bad thing “tout court”, I can see some situations where it could be helpful. On the other hand fostering an environment where we assume people are going to do nothing if not asked to do something can be a self fulfilling prophesy.

I believe that by fostering and rewarding a culture of awareness and collaboration while assuming people’s good intent, leaders can help and motivate people to do things because they want to, not because they are asked to do them.

The second observation that made me reflect is the fact that most of the activities proposed were activities that generally testers that work with me do as part of their normal day to day job and not as a once off during downtime. Among things of this type, LinkedIn users suggested:

analyse coverage and issues root cause, learn automation, cross skill with subject matter experts, review of tests, document procedures on wikis, read a work related book, blog, watch a video, self placed training, knowledge transfer, and other “improving” activities.

This point made me think that maybe my downtime is different from other people’s downtime. We do most of the activities suggested in the thread (apart from some wasteful ones) as part of our normal work, so let me tell you what my 2 types of downtime are.

Good downtime that we need to encourage and Bad downtime that we need to fight.

Good downtime: good downtime is planned downtime that we introduce into our process by limiting resource utilization for example by setting WIP limits and allowing for slack. This downtime is designed so that people don’t burn out. During this time people can do whatever they want from searching funny memes on the web, to going for a walk in the park, or if they prefer, studying something they want to learn, there is no limit to what people can do during good downtime. In my experience this downtime generally is of the form of 1 to 2-3 hours with cadence that depends on the specific context and can be fine tuned depending on project and people needs.

Bad downtime
Bad downtime

Bad downtime: This is unexpected downtime due to us waiting for something to do because the flow of work is blocked somewhere else in the system. Say for example the build is broken and can’t be progressed for us to do exploratory testing or the business analyst is on holidays and there is shortage of new user stories coming through. This is bad downtime because it is affecting the flow of value towards our customer. In this case t-shaped testers can help a lot to fix the issue, in fact they are able to support the developer stuck with the broken build or help in the creation of new user stories. When issues like the above happen, using tools like Kanban can be extremely helpful, in fact you will be able to visualize the issue immediately in the form of a bottleneck. The next thing to do is for the team (including but not limited to the people in downtime) to swarm around the bottleneck, reduce it and restart the flow.

If you want to continuously improve your flow, swarming and resolving bottlenecks is necessary but not sufficient. It is important that you resolve the root cause of the downtime and related bottleneck. One effective way to expose bad downtime so that we can identify patterns and fine tune our process is the waste snake, extremely easy to set up and use, I’d strongly recommend it.

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “On empowerment and the 2 types of downtime

  1. I agree with your views but that will happen in ideal case .. but generally if not reminded most of the people want to have down time… To have reviews/meetings during the downtime can save some actual productive time by preponing some meeting. that meeting could be for knowledge transfer too ….

    for your points,, everyone in the team should be self motivated, if not i have to be a little disagree

    • Gaurav, thanks for your feedback.
      Don’t look at it as an ideal case, ideal cases are utopia, my post is based on my current workplace, a real place. It doesn’t happen overnight, but everybody can do it if we really want.

      “everyone in the team should be self motivated” yes, and I prefer to assume it to be true rather than speculating that people don’t want to do anything but get their salary, I am afraid of self fulfilling prophesies 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s